SEARA’S CABOTAGE SHIPPING GROWS 84% IN TWO YEARS AND BECOMES A STRATEGIC

AND MORE SUSTAINABLE LOGISTICS OPTION

 

With plants placed in strategic locations, the Company has reduced the number of trucks being used on longer routes,

especially to Brazilian Northeast destinations, which also helps reduce environmental impacts

 

Seara sharply increased its cabotage shipping in the first half of 2019. The number of domestic shipments was 84% up on the first six months of 2017, improving on the Company’s 2018 growth in this area.

 

The business unit also set two consecutive records in April and May 2019, with 284 shipments each month. This growth validates Seara’s strategy to invest in cabotage as one of Brazil’s and its own major shipping options after the Company’s decision to invest in this area back in 2013, since when it has made steady progress.

 

Cabotage also has less of an environmental impact compared with other modes of transport. For example, compared with road haulage, it uses eight times less fuel. The volume of goods shipped on each trip is also much higher. According to the Brazil GHG Protocol, a ship’s greenhouse gas emissions are 15 times lower than a refrigerated truck carrying the same cargo.

 

“Seara will continue investing in cabotage as the significant volumes it produces in Santa Catarina now have an easier access to regional ports, in addition to which the Company has been able to reduce costs by cutting the use of trucks on long routes, mainly to destinations in the Brazilian Northeast region”, said Fábio Artifon, Seara Alimentos Logistics director. “Seara’s decision to increase use of coastal shipping is not just a financial one. Cabotage also reflects our focus on quality and sustainability, two issues of great importance to the Company. We plan to continue increasing cabotage shipments”, added the executive.

 

Cabotage is becoming an increasingly popular option for Brazilian cargo shipping. For the animal protein and food industry, it provides more efficient temperature controls because containers are connected to a constant power supply and temperatures are monitored during the entire trip.